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Statues in London

38 statues in London

Statues in London
Peter Pan Statue
(14)
The Peter Pan monument is located in Kensington Park, near the Lancaster Gate. This bronze statue was erected one night in secret for May Morning in 1912. It's of Peter Pan standing on a pedestal playing a small wind instrument. Peter Pan is the name of the fictional character that was created by the Scottish writer James Matthew Barrie for a musical that was held in London on December 27, 1904. According to Barrie's story, Peter is depicted as a little boy who refuses to grow-up and lives with a group of children (The Lost Boys) who are the same age as him. The country Neverland, is an island where pirates, as well as, fairies and mermaids live. It's also where Peter Pan has numerous fantastic adventures and lives for all eternity.
Statues in London
The Four Bronze Horses of Helios
(5)
This huge sculpture commemorates, but remembers correctly, soldiers killed in war. I don't remember the exact name as it was one of the 1st things I saw. The statue is in front of Piccadilly Circus subway entrance and near the Trocadero. I liked the strength and energy it gave off.
Statues in London
Sherlock Holmes Statue
(2)
A place in London, England, it doesn't serve Cantonese food, nor Catalan but delicious "Fish and ships" accompanied by a rich cold beer. It was there while we waited for the Tour on the River Thames and the city center. London is a beautiful place.
Statues in London
The Burghers of Calais
This magnificent sculpture by Auguste Rodin is to one side of the British Parliament close to the River Thames. It's made of bronze, is 2 meters high, 2.5 meters wide and consists of 6 figures. The curious thing is that there are several copies worldwide and the original is in the French town of Calais. The French made 12 copies with the original cast after Rodin's death. One of them is here but there are copies in the gardens of the Musée Rodin in Paris, at the Rodin Museum in Philadelphia, at Stanford University in California, at the Metropolitan Museum of New York, in the capital of Australia, in Jerusalem, in Tokyo and in Seoul.
Statues in London
Shaftesbury Memorial
(5)
The Shaftesbury Memorial, commonly known as the Statue of Eros, is one of the most famous statues in London. Right in the middle of Piccadilly Circus, the statue was built in 1893 in honour of Lord Shaftesbury and his efforts to ban child labour in the mines. The fountain is topped by a bronze angel, once the Angel of Christian Charity but more commonly known as Eros, the Greek god of love. It has become a symbol of the capital, standing in the middle of bustling Piccadilly Circus, and is popular at all hours with tourists taking pictures. It's unmissable at night when it's surrounded by the lights of Piccadilly.
Statues in London
The Thames Gateway
(1)
As well as the Embankment Gardens bronze sculptures dedicated to the military, there is this old door that was one of the entries from the River Thames to London.
Statues in London
Statue of Emmeline Pankhurst
A tribute to Emmeline Pankhurst (1857-1928) that is located, how could it be otherwise, in front of Parliament. Emmeline Pankhurst was one of the founders of the British suffragette movement and her name is associated, more than any other, with the fight for women's right to vote.
Statues in London
Alison Lapper Statue
(1)
I just read that the statue of Alison Lapper is no longer in Trafalgar Square, so this is a little memory that I share with those who have visited London in recent years. I don't know if you remember the controversy that accompanied the installation of this statue, which shows a naked, quadraplegic pregnant woman. It was supposed to pay homage to the disabled, but many in the art world were unhappy to see it here. I once saw an ad featuring Lapper cooking an omelette...with no arms or legs, her greatest ally was her mouth and careful use of gravity. This corner of Trafalgar Square houses temporary exhibits, and I remember this one fondly.
Statues in London
Statue of Oliver Cromwell
In 1894, the Prime Minister Lord Rosebery, a great admirer of Cromwell, proposed to erect a statue in his honor to commemorate what would have been his 300th birthday. No sooner said than done. The statue, designed by Hamo Thorneycroft, was raised five years later, on November 14, 1899, outside the Palace of Westminster. It shows the lord standing with his sword in one hand and the bible in the other on top of an equally imposing lion. We can't get too close to the statue, but it fits perfectly with the splendid building behind it. Have a look at it during your tour of the most famous monuments in the city!
Statues in London
Statues in London
Horse at Water
(2)
This sculpture is impossible to miss as you approach Marble Arch. The absolutely monumental horse's head is quite incongruous in the middle of the square. It is a work by the artist Nic Fiddian-Green and represents the equestrian tradition of the United Kingdom. The bronze statue is more than 10m high and weighs more than 6 tons, but the real surprise is that it has been installed upside down! It is the most modern addition to the area, keeping the numerous pigeons company.
Statues in London
Churchill Statue
A statue of Winston Churchill, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and from 1951 to 1955 is in Parliament Square. It stands in a great location opposite the well-known Big Ben, near the banks of Thames in central London.
Statues in London
Isis, the Egyptian goddess
(2)
Isis, one of the main deities of Egyptian mythology, symbol of fertility, the perfect mother, the perfect companion and protector of births, has been personified by the expert hand of Simon Gudgeon, a painter and sculptor born in London on October 4, 1958. This beautiful and almost ethereal figure is so perfect that it seems that it has always been surrounded by greenery, plants, flowers, birds and people who admire it. It was installed in 2009 and has attracted many visitors who come to admire the full extent of its three meters hight. Imposing and magnificent this bronze sculpture could not find a better frame than this park. The laudable purpose of the Foundation was to raise funds for the construction of a Center for Environmental Education for youth both as communities and groups can learn everything possible about the natural world and that's why the sign says identifies "Welcome Isis "and I assure you that this will feel.
Statues in London
Dr. Samuel Johnson Statue
(1)
This statue is located east of the courtyard of the church, which was the work of Percy Fitzgerald. It was erected in honor of Dr. Samuel Johnson, who attended Mass here. Dr. Johnson, born in 1709 and died in 1784, was a scholar of the eighteenth century in various disciplines. He was also a critic, essayist, scholar, biographer, poet, moralist, playwright and writer, famous both for his wit as for his controversial observations. The church was designed by Cristhopher Wren in 1680 and belongs to the Royal Air Force as can be seen on the inscription on the cross behind the statue.
Statues in London
Barge Master & Swan Marker Sculpture
Strolling in the early hours on a Sunday morning across Southwark Bridge I found this statue of an ancient tradition of the Middle Ages: The swans were a plate ate only the kings, so they were counted and counted by two companies, Vintners, which are those who have borne the monument, and whose head was in front of the statue and Dyers. The custom is still in vogue, but now all the cinemas of the Thames are protected.
Statues in London
Statue of George IV
George IV was born in London in 1762 and died in 1830. He was a very special king with a life which was quite scandalous for the time. He was patron of the arts and patron of several artists among whom was John Nash. This equestrian statue is located in the square which was originally called George IV. It was made by the famous sculptor Sir Francis Chantrey (1781/1841) in 1828 and is among his best known works. As you will see, the spring water splashed my camera, lol!
Statues in London
Monument to Major General Henry Haveloc
Located southeast of this amazing place is the statue of Sir Henry Haveloc (1795 - 1857), honoured for his outstanding service to the British Crown. He served in India and fought in the first Afghan war. He returned to India in 1857 where he soon died. He could not finish his studies and joined the military. In 1861 the English sculptor William Behnes (1795/1864) made this bronze statue that we see here today.
Statues in London
Monument to Baron Napier of Magdala Cornelis
The monument to the horse born in Ceylon (now in Sri Lanka), also known as the "Island of a thousand names" and a British colony until 1948, was designed in 1891 by the Viennese sculptor Sir Joseph Edgar Boehm (1834 / 1890) and cast in bronze by British sculptor Sir Alfred Gilbert (1854/1934). The equestrian statue is placed on a granite pedestal. In his right hand, he holds a pair of binoculars and both feet are firmly in the stirrups.
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