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Things to do in Newcastle Upon Tyne

127 contributors
  • Monuments
    27 places
  • Nightlife
    11 places
  • Shopping
    8 places
Activities in Newcastle Upon Tyne
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The most visited in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Streets in Newcastle Upon Tyne
The Castle
(3)
Streets in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Grey Street
(4)
Shopping Centres in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Northumberland Street
(2)
Gardens in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Statue of Cardinal Basil Hume
Churches in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Church of St Thomas the Martyr
(1)
Cathedrals in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Newcastle Cathedral
Train Stations in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Newcastle Station
(3)
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Hadrian's Wall
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
High Level Bridge
Nightlife Districts in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Quayside
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Swing Bridge
Villages in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Blyth
Universities in Newcastle Upon Tyne
University of Newcastle
Cathedrals in Newcastle Upon Tyne
St Mary's Cathedral
Markets in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Grainger Market
(1)
Shops in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Primark
(1)
Markets in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Bigg Market
Bars in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Old George
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Hadrian's Wall
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
High Level Bridge
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Swing Bridge
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
The Tyne Bridge
(2)
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Rutherford Memorial Fountain
(6)
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Grey's Monument
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Guildhall
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Black Gate
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Black Gate
(1)
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Angel of the North
(1)
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Santa María
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Bars in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Old George
Bars in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Forth Hotel Pub
Bars in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Duke Ellington
Bars in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Duke of Wellington
Bars in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Hoko 10
(1)
Bars in Newcastle Upon Tyne
The Red House
Bars in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Charles Grey Bar
Bars in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Bacchus
Bars in Newcastle Upon Tyne
The Lane
Bars in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Beehive

The top 58 attractions in Newcastle Upon Tyne

Streets in Newcastle Upon Tyne
The Castle
(3)
The city of Newcastle is named precisely for Castle Keep, a castle that was built by the Normans in 1080, on a Roman building on top of a hill overlooking the River Tyne. The castle has gone through many transformations throughout its long history, but today, some things still remain in its original form. It has an indoor museum where you can see a large number of old artifacts. What I liked about the castle is the climb to the top. You can enjoy amazing panoramic views of the city: With the train station behind you, the river and bridges near Gateshead to the side, and the cathedral on the opposite side.
Streets in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Grey Street
(4)
Grey Street is in the Grainger neighborhood, which is the "new" neighborhood as it built during the industrial revolution. It is also an entry point for Monument Metro Station. Grainger reformed the neighborhood making it cleaner. The street leading out from Grey's Monument (which is a column) goes down to Gateshead. John Dobson and Richard Grainger (the 1830s city architect) built Grey Street. Leaving the column you first come to the Theatre Royal, then posh pubs and cafes - it is a lively area and close to all the stores. The street is mostly famous for its elegant architecture and its seamless integration between buildings and monuments - it was voted the most beautiful street in the UK in a competition organized by the BBC. The street was used to carry goods to the nearby Bigg and Grainger markets, but since it has such a great historical value the trucks were re-routed - to the benefit of most pedestrians.
Shopping Centres in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Northumberland Street
(2)
Northumberland Street is a street full of shops, in the heart of Newcastle, and Haymarket neighborhood far in the north to the Monument Metro Station and south Grey column. It's the most expensive street in the country to open a store outside London! Among the shops you'll find Marks & Spencers, Zawi, formerly Virgin Megastore but changed its name, there is an H&M, and the 1st Fenwick (a store similar to El Corte Ingles). Now the street is pedestrianized, until 1999 there was traffic on the northern stretch, but it was closed and renovated as the street looked a bit old. It's a nice place, it's a shame there are not more fast food restaurants. The road continues to the River Tyne, at the height of the Tyne Bridge, and becomes more residential. This part was formerly the main highway that went from London to Edinburgh.
Gardens in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Statue of Cardinal Basil Hume
Basil Hume's memorial is a small garden that lies in front of the church of Saint Mary, and commemorates the life of Cardinal Basil Hume Osb, who lived from 1923-1999. He was a Benedictine monk and also the cardinal archbishop of Westminster, is a Newcastle boy, greatly beloved by his city. This statue and garden were constructed in 2002 under an order of the inhabitants and the municipality, reflecting the condition of the cardinal to the landscapes of the region of Northumbria, with plants found in the area around the city as well as in the Inner Farne Island, an island off the coast where the monks first lived as hermits bishops. You can also see the translation in modern English of the old Catholic poem that was originally in medieval English. The stones were brought from the Holy Island and Inner Farne, like those of AMpleforth, the house of Basil Hume. It was Queen Elizabeth II who opened this memorial. She is Anglican this gesture demonstrates the respect that the cardinal receieved by the Anglican people.
Churches in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Church of St Thomas the Martyr
(1)
St. Thomas Church is one of the iconic places in Newcastle, located near the two universities, the civic center and the shopping district of Haymarket. It has a medieval chapel, which is said to have been built by one of the murderers of St. Thomas himself. St. Thomas was killed in 1170 by a group of English gentlemen, on the order of King Henry II. He was canonized shortly after his death, regarded as a defender of the Church against royal power. The new church was built by John Dobson, in a Gothic style and completed in 1830. An organ was added two years later. Now the church is recognized as a historic monument. It does not belong to any particular diocese, but it is Anglican, making it unique in the UK.
Cathedrals in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Newcastle Cathedral
The rapid growth of the city of Newcastle was due to the population being attracted by the booming industries in the 19th century and later led to the construction of more than 20 churches around the second half of the 19th century. They named the Church of St Nicholas as a cathedral, the principle church of the region. But the church is a lot older than that, dating back to the 15th century, constructed in the fragments of an older Norman church from 1175. The main part of the church is its bell tower, constructed in 1470, some 60 years before that of Edinburgh, which is very similar. Inside you can find, among other things, a memorial for the Amiral Collingwood, who took control of the battle of Trafalgar after the death of Amiral Nelson. He was born close to the cathedral in a small house.
Train Stations in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Newcastle Station
(3)
Newcastle station is located in the upper part of the city, near the castle. In fact, some of the train tracks run inside the ancient walls of the castle. It is not ideal for local trains, it is best to try to use the bus. The train offers good options for longer distances if you buy in advance or take advantage of offers from National Rail, for example if 2 people are traveling, the third and fourth travel free. The station closes early, at 11 pm. Edinburgh is about 2 hours away by train, London is between 3 and 6 depending on whether you go on a fast train or normal train.
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Hadrian's Wall
Last summer (2012) one of my dreams came true! I walked along Hadrian's Wall. It was an incredible experience. The landscapes were wonderful (it almost borders Scotland, which says it all). I recommend the tour group I went with, http://www.mickledore.co.uk/walking-holidays/hadrians_wall. They handle thousands of tours each year and give directions, detailed maps, take care of the B&B accommodation (very good), and will transport your luggage for you (A great joy to see your luggage!). The rest is up to you and your desire to walk and enjoy the scenery. You can have your "Summer Pasport" stamped at different points (kind of like the passport for the Camino de Santiago). The weather is like the English weather, but we had sun most days. If you cross your fingers, it usually brings luck.
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
High Level Bridge
The High Level Bridge is for cars and trains to cross the river Tyne between Newcastle and Gateshead. It was built by Robert Stephenson in about 1850, and is the first example of wrought iron construction of this amplitude. The bridge is quite narrow and trains and cars don't pass on the same level. It is 400 meters above the river valley and over 130 meters above the water. From the bridge, which you can also cross on foot, there are wonderful views over the other Tyne bridges and Newcastle. There are 6 pillars in the water and a total of 14. Cars and pedestrians pass under and the train above, going from Newcastle to the north. In those days, the private train company in the region had it built, to improve the line between Edinburgh and London. Restored in 2005, the bridge is now more beautiful than ever.
Nightlife Districts in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Quayside
Said to be the most fashionable area in Newcastle now. It makes sense. For starters, it has become very luxurious: The short walk that takes you from Grey Street to the area of ​​the bridges across the Quayside is wonderful. But in addition, the area is filled with popular restaurants of all kinds (Arabs, Indians, Mongols ...). And, of course, there are the pubs and clubs to have a drink. In Newcastle there is also plenty of nightlife and the Quayside has all the ingredients to become a major player in the local nightscene. It is very modern and very trendy, a great place to see and be seen.
Historical Monuments in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Swing Bridge
Newcastle is a city known for its beautiful bridges over the river Tyne. Gateshead, connecting the city to the other side of the river, is a swing bridge. It is one of the oldest, immediately recognized for its beautiful red and white coloring. It is situated between the Tyne Bridge and the High Level Bridge. With hydraulic power it can move to let in large ships bringing goods to the city or taking steel and other industrial productions out of the city. The mechanism used is the same as was used when it was built in 1876. The bridge was commissioned and paid for by William Armstrong, a wealthy industrialist of the city, which created the rule Armstrong Whitworth. It was he who developed hydropower and designed the bridge. The bridge is 85 meters and has a central axis of rotation that allows 360 degree move entering and leaving the boats. In the center is a cabin to handle.
Villages in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Blyth
Blyth is a town on the Northumberland coast, which is located about 20 km north of Newcastle. The city's name, which in English describes a market town, compared to a town without a single shop. But Blyth has about 5000 inhabitants, and almost 35000 in the region. To reach Blyth (pronounced Blais), you can take a bus from Newcastle that runs along the coast and the town of Whitley Bay, which is worth visiting. Or you can take a train to go to Cramlington and from there get another bus to Blyth. It is a bit faster but you miss out on the landscapes. Brits go to Blyth for the summer and go out in sail boats, to breathe in the the air, a bit like you would do if you went to Asturias, to spend time in nature and whilst relaxing. Quite good weather, not very warm, but it's perfect for a lot of sports. With regard to accommodation, there are some bed and breakfasts in the center, but I would recommend renting a house in the outskirts, in nature.
Universities in Newcastle Upon Tyne
University of Newcastle
Newcastle University was founded in 1834 because of the excellence and proliferation of the area's former medical school. In fact, it's one of the most sought after schools for medical studies throughout the United Kingdom (making it one of the most difficult medical schools to get into). The university has several buildings with different characteristics, almost all in the city centre, but they mainly emphasize the Victorian era when the university was founded. The complexes are really architecturally beautiful, and you can visit them freely. The main building, built in red brick with a clock tower and logo, as well as other buildings in the same form, really highlight their splendid facades and coats of arms. The least remarkable are the modern large building blocks, which add nothing to the university's original aesthetics, though they undoubtedly offer a practicality. They provide functionality to the college. Strolling among its historic buildings, it reminds you of Cambridge and even certain areas of Oxford. It evokes a Victorian era thought, where studying was a privilege not available to everyone.
Cathedrals in Newcastle Upon Tyne
St Mary's Cathedral
St. Mary's Cathedral is the main Roman Catholic church in Newcastle and is the church that runs the diocese of the city. It was built in the first half of the nineteenth century and is a historical monument as it is a very good example of the new gothic style, built by Augustus Pugin. The Catholic Church has regained some importance in England, after a long period of Anglicanism. The church was opened to the public in 1844, becoming a cathedral in 1850. It is located near Newcastle Station, the latter being in the center of the two cathedrals, the Anglican and Catholic. You can visit outside the hours of masses. There are precious works of art such as stained glass windows in the carved Gothic arches, representing Mary Magdalene, St. Thomas, San Pedro and San Stefano and the Assumption of the Virgin.
Markets in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Grainger Market
(1)
Grainger Market is an indoor market in the renovated area of ​​Grainger Street, an area that was completely built from scratch during the industrial revolution. It also has wider streets and classical buildings made of stone, replacing wooden medieval houses. The market is covered and replaces the markets we had in Grey Street, and were unhygienic. It's a historical monument but still used, of course the prices are significantly cheaper than in supermarkets. The reason is that supermarkets do the same prices throughout the country, in London, a very expensive city and Scotland, cheaper. So here is a cheap Region where better to buy local products. Grainger is still a lively place with more than 250 businesses, and some have been managed by the same family since the market opened. It is also the oldest store of Marks & Spencer's that is still open, the Penny Bazaar, operating since 1895!
Shops in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Primark
(1)
Primark is the temple of cheap fashion that does not cost much but has style and everyone asks you where you got your clothe from. It is a bit like H & M in Sweden and in England there is a reference to Primark fashion, especially during the sales. Prices for the garments start at under 5 pounds and accessories below 1 pound! It's actually an Irish Store. There are shops in Ireland, the UK and Spain which are very new. And they now accept long distance buying from outside the country and you can get everything from home. Primark started in the 70s but it was at the beginning of 2000 that the brand really took off, becoming the focus of the younger generation. The shop in Newcastle is located in Northumberland Road.
Markets in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Bigg Market
Bigg Market is a street in central Newcastle. In this part of the city, streets are still crooked, winding alleys, medieval houses, unlike the Grainger neighborhood, which is an example of modern urbanization, as they did in most modern European cities during the industrial revolution, destroying and re-building airer, cleaner and more modern areas. Bigg Market is filled with pubs, small restaurants and bars that stay open late, ie until 2am latest because the limit for english pubs, is 11 pm, and the English begin to drink very early on, and at twelve o'clock they are ready to go to sleep. It is one of the liveliest districts of the city, even though the new Quayside neighborhood next to the river makes for tough competition in recent years. There is also a market open on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
Bars in Newcastle Upon Tyne
Old George
It's said that the Old George is the oldest pub in Newcastle. This legend is argued between 2 pubs, but the truth is that it is very old and historical as they say these bars, always placed in monuments recognised by English society for the conservation of historical monuments. It was built in the 17th century, and was then a place where the carriage stopped. It had a farm, a garage and hotel services for men. The pub is near San Nicolas Cathedral. It's built over 3 floors that are welcoming, particularly the top, as it has more chairs and tables. The ceilings are quite low and preserve ancient wood. It's said that King Charles 1st stayed there in 1650. You can still see the room where he slept.

The best things to do in Newcastle Upon Tyne

Newcastle is a small town on the east coast of the County Wicklow, Ireland. Despite its small size, there are some monuments and attractions in Newcastle, like Dundrum Castle or Annalong Corn Mill. There are also some parks and green places to visit in Newcastle. Silent Valley, Ben Crom Reservoirs, Tollymore Forest Park, Slieve Donard, Kilbroney Park or Murlough National Nature Reserve are just a few things to see in Newcastle where you can enjoy the fresh air and relaxation. If you're traveling with children, some amusement parks where you can spend the day are Tropicana, GASP - Gravity Action Sports Park and Funny Farm Adventures. Among the things to do in Newcastle is being able to enjoy the many outdoor activities, like golf, other sports and cycling tours in the city's surroundings. If you want to know what to do in Newcastle today, you'll find some
Newcastle
activities and excursions to do in Northern Ireland online. On Minube you'll find other
interesting
stuff to do in Newcastle. Some travelers suggest the most striking
Newcastle attractions. Take advantage of your time, make your own route
through the points that interest you and make the most of your experience this holiday.