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Things to do in Hiroshima

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Activities in Hiroshima
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The most visited in Hiroshima
Temples in Miyajima
Itsukushima Shrine
(17)
Islands in Miyajima
Miyajima
(11)
Of Cultural Interest in Hiroshima
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park
(10)
Museums in Hiroshima
Peace Memorial Museum
(4)
Of Cultural Interest in Hiroshima
Hiroshima
(6)
Historical Monuments in Hiroshima
Hiroshima Peace Memorial (Atomic Bomb Dome)
(5)
Statues in Hiroshima
Children's Peace Monument
(7)
Castles in Hiroshima
Hiroshima Castle
(2)
Gardens in Hiroshima
Shukkei-en
(2)
Islands in Miyajima
Sunset in Miyajima
(1)
Viewpoints in Hiroshima
Miyajima Ropeway
(2)
Viewpoints in Miyajima
Shishiiwa Viewpoint
(3)
Historical Monuments in Hiroshima
Memorial Cenotaph
(3)
Hiking in Miyajima
Mount Misen
Of Cultural Interest in Miyajima
Close Iwaso Ryokan
Hiking in Miyajima
Daisho-in
Gardens in Hiroshima
Hijiyama Park
Theme Parks in Hiroshima
Peace Bell
(1)
Historical Monuments in Hiroshima
Hiroshima Peace Memorial (Atomic Bomb Dome)
(5)
Historical Monuments in Hiroshima
Memorial Cenotaph
(3)
Historical Monuments in Hiroshima
(2)
Historical Monuments in Onomichi
Historical Monuments in Onomichi
Historical Monuments in Itsukushima
Historical Monuments in Onomichi
Historical Monuments in Hiroshima

The top 64 attractions in Hiroshima

Temples in Miyajima
Itsukushima Shrine
(17)
Miyajima has something magical. We arrived at noon from Hiroshima. We spent the afternoon on the island and finally spent a day in Deer Isle. The magic begins when you first see the ferry appear from the Seto Inland Sea. It is the entrance gate of Itsukushima Shinto temple. I watched from different distances and at different times: Down Mt Misen, going to Mt Misen, at noon when it seems to float in the morning, in the evening when there stuck in the sand and tourists rub it, and looked for night. The typical black, red, and blue background image of Japan really caught me attention.
Islands in Miyajima
Miyajima
(11)
Situated several train stations from JR Hiroshima is Miyajima Island, an ideal place to make a day trip from Hirshima, famous for the Shrine pagtrimonio of humanity, but it also has many other attractions, parks, walking , countless nooks where you can take a stroll, read or write, you can choose to walk or take a cable car up for the price of about 15 euro to the top from where there are views of the island, I decided not to go up, and I stayed at the bottom reading and walking between the sea and forests
Of Cultural Interest in Hiroshima
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park
(10)
The Hiroshima Peace Memorial is located downtown and houses several memorials to the atomic bomb. One one side, there's the museum, and on the other the dome where people can see the results of that harrowing day on August 6, 1945. Each year, a tribute to the victims is performed and anti-nuclear and pro-peace messages are released in in the park. There are many school children around, and it's a pleasant place despite what happened there. If you come to Japan, I recommend visiting.
Museums in Hiroshima
Peace Memorial Museum
(4)
If you visit the Peace Park in Hiroshima, I recommend taking an hour and going to the Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima. The entry fee is a bargain, favor of pacifism, and I also recommend renting the audioguides available in many languages. The information helps you understand the magnitude of the tragedy that happened on August 6, 1945. The museum displays photographs of the event, models, exhibits, and various pacifist materials. It's a good choice for your visit to Hiroshima.
Of Cultural Interest in Hiroshima
Hiroshima
(6)
Hiroshima (広 島 市) is a city known worldwide for the tragedy that happened there nearly 65 years ago. Now the city is much more, a thoroughly modern city and completely rebuilt but unfortunately, when I was there I had no time to enjoy the city. As a tourist, I went to ground zero, what little remains of that ancient Hiroshima where the first atomic bomb exploded during WW2. Hiroshima is south of the island of Honshu, the largest in Japan (where Tokyo is). It was founded in 1589 by Mori Terumoto, but did not acquire city status until 1889 during the Meiji era. It currently has a population of over 1 million inhabitants. The explosion of the atomic bomb on August 6 1945, killed more than 120,000 people (excluding those who died later from radiation and other effects of the explosion) and very few buildings were left standing. The building in the 2nd photo is the only one left standing of the few that withstood the blast. At ground zero of the city there is a memorial park for the tragedy and a museum. This visit is very hard, as it explains in detail what happened to the inhabitants of Hiroshima in 1945, in the hope that it does not happen again.
Historical Monuments in Hiroshima
Hiroshima Peace Memorial (Atomic Bomb Dome)
(5)
The A-bomb dome is the skeleton of what was once the Hiroshima Prefecture Industrial Promotion Hall built by a Czech architect with an obvious Central European design. It is one of the few buildings which survived the bast of the atomic bomb that is still preserved today. The A-bomb dome is a tourist monument of irons, bricks and cement, is listed as a UNESCO historical monument. It pays tribute to the victims of the atomic bomb. During the rainy, grey days of early summer, it's a sad and sorrowful place, especially with the arrival of the history teacher and his group of students with their red caps and white. This corner is located at the entrance of the Peace Park and, if arriving on the number 2 tram from the train station, just in front of the stop.
Statues in Hiroshima
Children's Peace Monument
(7)
In the Peace Park in Hiroshima, Japan is where you'll find the Children's Peace Monument. It's a tribute to all of the children ve died as a result of the atomic bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. This statue is also a tribute to a girl named Sadako. After the radiation exposure from the bomb, Sadako suffered from leukemia. She fought the disease and died. In the sculpture we can see the spark plugs clock marking the exact time of the fall of the bomb as the playing children figures fly. From the statue hangs a crane. Around the statue are urns with thousands of origami paper cranes to honor the dead children as well as Sadako. You can see these origami cranes in many sculptures of the park. Actually, if you find school children here ve come to the park to practice English with tourists, after a brief conversation in English they'll reward you with an origami crane in gratitude.
Castles in Hiroshima
Hiroshima Castle
(2)
Hiroshima Castle (広 島 城) is one of the symbols of the city. It was built in the late 16th century by Mori Terumoto (who was on the Council of Five Regents created by Toyotomi Hideyoshi), who came to rule 9 provinces (in what is now southwestern Honshu and northern Kyushu). There are several canals built around the castle which were used to transport construction material, served as a defense against attacks, and helped transportation flow throughout the neighborhoods of Hiroshima. The current castle is a replica of what existed before the atom bomb destroyed the original. There is a reconstruction of what was once the wall and the main tower (inside of which there is a small museum about the history of the castle and the town between the 16th and 19th centuries). Inside, there is also a place where you can try on a samurai costume. It is one of my favorite photos! :O)
Gardens in Hiroshima
Shukkei-en
(2)
Shukkei-en is a lovely Japanese garden in Hiroshima. Since it requires a lot of careful maintenance in order to remain an "oasis" in the city, an entry fee is charged (I can't recall if it was 2 or 3 Euros), but I think it was worth it. While it does not offer anything spectacular compared with other gardens (like in Kyoto, for instance), it isn't as swarmed with tourists because it is not as well known. Even in high tourist season, it's an ideal place to relax. Although it is especially beautiful in the fall (as you can see in one of the photos), I also have a video recorded in summertime so you can get an idea.
Islands in Miyajima
Sunset in Miyajima
(1)
After spending a morning at the Peace Park in Hiroshima, I went to Miyajima Miyajima guchi guchi and JR took the ferry to get to Miyajima. I got to the island at 2 in the afternoon, during high tide, the torii of Miyajima was in the water. I strolled around the island and went to the top of the summit by cable car and then walked down the streets between temples and forest. I walked down the boardwalk and went to take the ferry across to Miyajima guchi. It was great. The sky was on fire. All eyes were looking to the sky. A sunset with the full range of colors of the flames. The ferry ride was very short. I was entranced by the beauty of the sunset, in Japan and in July, between seven and eight o'clock.
Viewpoints in Hiroshima
Miyajima Ropeway
(2)
2 ropes way connected so long way.
Viewpoints in Miyajima
Shishiiwa Viewpoint
(3)
If you enjoy majestic views of the inland sea, you absolutely must climb Mount Misen. You can continue up to the summit which is about 100 meters above this viewpoint. This really isn't even necessary because the views from there are already incredible. The site can be accessed on foot or in a cable car. I would have loved to walk up the hill and enjoy the virgin forest, but I enjoyed uploading a rented bikes and we parked in front of one of the most interesting, Momijidani Park, which Valley is Japanese maples, and should be even more impressive in autumn ... But the heat was unbearable that day and so don't even try walking. The rise in the cable car is not very expensive, are about 15 euros round trip, and the views are amazing, but if you go with good weather and you enjoy hiking, well worth doing at least some of the walking steps. Besides temples you meet along the way. With a little luck you stumble upon any of the monkeys living on the island, and it seems to be common to find, though I had no luck. Yes, darling, you have the hand very long ;) For me, a must if you're going to Miyajima.
Historical Monuments in Hiroshima
Memorial Cenotaph
(3)
Before reaching Hiroshima and walking through the Peace Park, the word "cenotaph" didn't exist in my vocabulary. A quick Google search helped me learn that it's a large tomb dedicated to celebrated persons. The cenotaph designed by Kenzo Tange commemorates the death of the 200,000 inhabitants of the city ve were killed by the atomic bomb. Along with those of some of the pyramids of Egypt, the Hiroshima cenotaph is among the most famous cenotaphs in the world. It is a rectangular structure with water and an austere candle in memory of the victims. Everybody passes before it with extreme respect and it is one of the most-visited places in the park.
Hiking in Miyajima
Mount Misen
There are two ways to get to the top: walk (it's really difficult) half the way in a cable car and walk the rest. The cable car price 1000 yen one way and return 1800. You have to be very careful, wear suitable shoes as we saw the odd snake, you do not see how fast I went down, jejejejeje. The cable car leaves you halfway and then you go to the top of a fairly steep road and drive down or get the cable cars.
Of Cultural Interest in Miyajima
Close Iwaso Ryokan
In May 2010 we went to Japan for the 1st time Mary my wife and I, we were married on the 15th and decided to see the modern and traditional Japan. One of the destinations was Miyajima Island. It is close to Hiroshima and a sacred island that is the heritage of humanity. Fawns go around freely, it houses important Buddhist temples. Very close to our lodging was down riachuleo up her cause we have this amazing view and I took what I consider one of my best pictures. Hope you enjoy it as much as I did.
Hiking in Miyajima
Daisho-in
This path can be walked in about two hours from the station, near the top of Mt Misen. It has fantastic views of the inland sea, forests and sanctuaries. Leaving the station, you start walking along a road that leads across a rainforest, where I stumbled upon the first Jizo. These small statuettes represent the protective spirits of the souls of children ve have died before their parents. Occasionally, I found a temple with monks in, the ruins of what was once a temple or a shrine. I also enjoyed the rugged landscape of streams, mountains and I saw some deer. A very interesting tour. At the end of the path is the Daisho-In temple. It closes at five so I had to wait until tomorrow to visit.
Gardens in Hiroshima
Hijiyama Park
This is the perfect park to go to after spending the morning visiting the museums and the Peace Memorial Park. Here at Park Hijiyama tourists barely come. It's about 2 km from the museum, but you'll be there after a half-hour walk. It's a good place to unwind, perfect for walking, reading, and there are several things to see: on the one hand there's the Taman In Temple, with its buildings, statues and in the middle with a cemetery, and at the top of the park is the museum of contemporary art and a manga library for those interested in culture.
Theme Parks in Hiroshima
Peace Bell
(1)
A rainy day in Hiroshima and walking in the commemorative Peace Park, you realize that all park sculptures express the intense pain and suffering, the hope of a lasting peace and emptiness when everything breaks . Each one has a mountain of origami cranes that visitors have left in their views. In one corner of the park is the peace bell, the ringing means world peace is desirable. I tried ringing the bell, at first very gently so as not to disturb the Japanese silence, sound was negligible. The second time I rang it harder, the clang echoed in my head for several seconds and Japanese ve roamed the park looked at me and smiled. I blushed. From the main train station take tram 2 and you'll arrive at the park.